Space & Polity: Special Issue on Neoliberalism

SPECIAL ISSUE: IN, AGAINST, BEYOND NEOLIBERALISM: THE “CRISIS” AND ALTERNATIVE POLITICAL FUTURES

GUEST EDITORS: David Featherstone, Andrew Cumbers, Kate Driscoll Derickson, Danny Mackinnon, Paul Routledge and Kendra Strauss

INTRODUCTION

In, against and beyond neo-liberalism: The “crisis” and alternative political futures
David Featherstone, Kendra Strauss and Danny MacKinnon 1

PAPERS

Thinking the crisis politically: lineages of resistance to neo-liberalism and the politics of the present conjuncture
David Featherstone 12

Topologies and topographies of Ireland’s neoliberal crisis
Cian O’Callaghan, Sinéad Kelly, Mark Boyle and Rob Kitchin 31

Towards resonant places: reflections on the organizing strategy of the International Transport Workers’ Federation
Jeremy Anderson 47

Constructing a global commons in, against and beyond the state
Andrew Cumbers 62

Remunicipalization in German cities: contesting neo-liberalism and reimagining urban governance?
Sören Becker, Ross Beveridge and Matthias Naumann 76

Knowing about crisis
Kate Driscoll Derickson, Gehan MacLeod and Verene Nicolas 91

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Special Issue on Ranciere

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Just out: a new special issue of Space & Polity on the thought of Jacques Ranciere and how it might be useful for political action today. I edited the special issue, which includes articles by:

Erik Swyngedouw:
Where is the political? Insurgent mobilisations and the incipient “return of the political”

Mark Davidson and Kurt Iveson:
Occupations, mediations, subjectifications: fabricating politics

Paul Hanson:
Cleveland’s Hough riots of 1966: ghettoisation and egalitarian (re)inscription

Mark Purcell:
Rancière and revolution

Kate Booth and Stewart Williams:
A more-than-human political moment (and other natural catastrophes)

You can find more information, and abstracts, here.

My introduction to the special issue is available free to the first 50 people who ask for it, which you can do here. My long article, “Ranciere and Revolution,” argues that we need to augment Ranciere with Deleuze and Guattari’s political thought. It is available as well, though I can’t find a reprint link in my Taylor and Francis account, so you can just e-mail me to get that one.